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Contributing Authors

Writing Historical Novels will feature a range of guest articles throughout 2015, including from New York Times bestselling novelists.

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The line-up for 2014 had to be cancelled due to my ill health during 2014.

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The monthly contributing authors for Writing Historical Novels for 2013 were:

Adrian Goldsworthy

Anne Perry

Anthony Riches

Ben Kane

DE Johnson

Douglas W Jacobson

Emma Darwin

Eva Stachniak

Gary Worthington

Jane Johnson

Jane Kirkpatrick

Judith Cutler

Julian Stockwin

Kathleen Benner Duble

Mary Nichols

Michael White

Paul Dowswell

Stephanie Cowell

Timeri Murari

William Dietrich

Guest Articles

6 Comments Post a comment
  1. This is a great site for all of us who write historical fiction. How do you get to be a ‘contributing author’?

    April 1, 2013
    • Apologies for the delay in responding to your question.
      Becoming a contributor for Writing Historical Novels is by invitation. Novelists considered for the site will generally have at least two (but usually more) historical novels published with at least one major publisher, as well as having detailed knowledge of a particular historical time and place or another relevant area of competence or specialist knowledge.
      Generally their novels will also be in print both in the US and the UK, and be available to mainstream booksellers through mainstream distributors.

      May 21, 2013
  2. I’m curious as well as to how one can become a ‘contributing author’. Great site! Keep up the interesting posts.
    Thanks!

    May 20, 2013
    • Becoming a contributor for Writing Historical Novels is by invitation. Novelists considered for the site will generally have at least two (but usually more) historical novels published with at least one major publisher, as well as having detailed knowledge of a particular historical time and place or another relevant area of competence or specialist knowledge.
      Generally their novels will also be in print both in the US and the UK, and be available to mainstream booksellers through mainstream distributors.

      May 21, 2013
  3. Understanding that your standard practice is only authors with major publishers, is there ever consideration given to those authors who have elected to self-publish, but in exchange for that particular bona fide, make up for the lack of having a publisher with commercial and critical success?

    Given the rapidly changing landscape in the publishing industry, it would seem to be appropriate to include those indie authors who have experienced a warm reception with readers so that they can share what they’ve learned.

    Just a suggestion.

    June 7, 2013
    • The short answer is that self-published novelists are not ruled out.

      I’d have to be convinced that any self-published novelist being considered was operating at a similar level to established novelists with major publishers (typically with 2+ novels already released with a major publisher, at the lower end, as well as an area of knowledge to draw from – many contributors are historians, are currently or have formally been in senior publishing or editing roles at major publishers, have a career relevant to their subject matter spanning decades prior to becoming a novelist, have advanced university degrees or otherwise have some established area of knowledge).

      I realise that self-published doesn’t necessarily mean lesser quality. However, many self-published titles – and it would probably be fair to say the vast majority of self-published titles – fall short of general industry standards in areas such as story concept and content, editing, cover design, distribution methods, marketing methods and building a readership.

      Sometimes crossover occurs. Even some #1 New York Times bestselling novelists publish their own ebooks or international editions. At least one of this year’s main contributors is self-published in ebook form as well as being published in print by a major publisher and a minor publisher.

      June 8, 2013

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